The Captain James Skilton Family Association

Skilton Grand Numbers

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Skilton Grand Numbers and Short Grand Numbers

The current Grand Number plan has been in use since 1964 when it replaced the original Grand Number plan used in the Cyclopeedy and Supplement I.  All genealogical data published since 1964 has used the new Grand Number notation.

The current Grand Number plan has been in use since 1964 when it replaced the original Grand Number plan used in the Cyclopeedy and Supplement I.  All genealogical data published since 1964 has used the new Grand Number notation.

As we connect with cousins outside of our familiar circle of relatives, a shorthand way of defining where we each fit into the family can be very helpful.  The Grand Number assigned to each person met this need. 

The Grand Number consisted of the Tine, the Generation, and a Sequential Number assigned by a family recordkeeper.  If you don't know your Grand Number, you may be able to look it up.  If you never had a Grand Number, it can not be "derived" from something else, and there is no one today assigning Grand Numbers.

However, your Short Grand Number can also quickly convey useful information that can help two people determine their relationship with each other, and it can be quickly and easily derived.  

The Short Grand Number (SGN) consists of the first two parts of the Grand Number and an optional suffix: 
  1. The Tine from which one is descended. 
  2. The number of generations back to Captain James Skilton. 
  3. A suffix which is a 
    • lower case “s” for spouse/partner, 
    • lower case “a” for adopted, or 
    • lower case “p” for stepchild.
Because the Short Grand Number is made up of the first two parts of the Grand Number, it is a notation very familiar to many in the family, and anyone can easily derive their Short Grand Number.  For example, I am descended from Samuel William Southmayd Skilton (Tine 7) and I am the 6th generation (F) counting Captain James as the 1st generation (A).  Thus my Short Grand Number is 7F.  

In a recent conversation with a cousin, we determined that his SGN is 2F.  From his SGN, I immediately knew several things:
  • He is descended from Tine 2.
  • He and I are the same number of generations down from Captain James.  
  • Since we are both generation F and we are not on the same Tine, I know we are 4th cousins.
  • If we were on the same Tine it would take a little more research to define our relationship, but I know we 3rd cousins or closer.
Everything one needs to determine their SGN is available on our website (www.skiltons.org).  
 
The quickest way to determine your Short Grand Number is to use the Cyclopedy, the Supplement, and the Reunion Report Index for 1970 and earlier (all of which are available here).  Search for a parent, grandparent, or great-grandparent, and once you find them, you should have enough information to determine your Tine and generation. 
 
For additional information on Skilton Grand Numbers and Short Grand Numbers, and tips on deriving your SGN, please click below

Skilton Family Grand Numbers

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